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"Vehicle Protection Center": stay away!

Paper spam, today. An official-looking mailer (fold side edges, then remove top stub to open) starting with bold, underlined text, “THIS LETTER IS TO INFORM YOU that if your factory warranty has expired, you will be responsible for paying for any repairs.”

Read that sentence again, because I did. Rephrase it: “If your umbrella is closed, you will get wet when it rains.” When I read obfuscation like that, I get suspicious immediately. All caps PLEASE CALL IMMEDIATELY in the next block of the letter really raises my hackles, just because I get ornery when I feel like I’m being herded.

Sure enough, despite including the make, model (Honda) and year of one of our cars, this mailing had nothing to do with Honda, and probably not with any other manufacturer. In fine print at the bottom, “Vehicle Protection Center is an independent nationwide company marketing vehicle service contract on behalf of leading third party administrators.” Which means nothing. Third sentence of that paragraph: “Vehicle Protection Center is not affiliated with any auto dealer or manufacturer.”

Here’s the thing: I never had any intention of purchasing an extended warranty. I turned it down when we bought the vehicle. Our history is of driving cars for years—decades, now—beyond their warrantees, and if they break, we pay for it. (Revolutionary, I know.) So I looked these folks up online. Sure enough, I don’t have to scroll too far down in the search results to find a page titled “Don’t be fooled by this vehicle extended warranty mailer from Vehicle Protection Center”.

This mailer is sleazy, and I’m posting this not because I think my regular readers would be fooled, but because I want that link above to come up closer to the top of search results.

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